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Glenn Hegar
Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts
Glenn Hegar
Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts
Glenn Hegar
Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts

Supply Chain Nexus

Hidalgo County International Bridge Crossings

One in a series of reports the Comptroller has prepared on Texas supply chains; for more information please see below.

Border crossings support global supply chains by facilitating the movement of people and goods between neighboring countries. Trade between Texas and Mexico represents a significant contribution to the state economy, and the cross-border trade of intermediate goods (components of final products) is an integral part of many industries’ supply chains. The five Hidalgo County border crossings are part of the 11 land ports along Texas’ 1,254-mile-long border with Mexico.


Hidalgo County Border Crossings

The Hidalgo County ports of entry include five international bridges that connect the U.S. to Mexico:












The Hidalgo County ports of entry include five international bridges that connect the U.S. to Mexico:

  • The Anzalduas International Bridge is the westernmost bridge in Mission, Texas.
  • East of the Anzalduas International Bridge is the McAllen-Hidalgo International Bridge, located in McAllen, Texas.
  • East of the McAllen-Hidalgo International Bridge is the Pharr-Reynosa International Bridge in Hidalgo, Texas.
  • East of the Pharr-Reynosa International Bridge is the Donna-Rio Bravo International Bridge, located between Hidalgo and Progreso.
  • The easternmost bridge is the Progreso-Nuevo Progreso International Bridge in Progreso, Texas.

724,000 trucks made official northbound
border crossings through Hidalgo County in 2020.

Hidalgo County Ports of Entry

While electronics, machinery and petroleum lead the way in trade value, the five Hidalgo County border crossings are gateways for fresh produce into the U.S. In 2020, $4.5 billion in fruits and vegetables were imported into Texas from Mexico for personal and commercial consumption.

The top 10 commodities traded across the five Hidalgo County international bridges account for 86 percent of all trade through these ports.


Northbound Official Hidalgo County Border Crossings, 2020

Pedestrians
2,079,696

Cars
3,371,049

Trucks
724,015

Ports of Entry Trade Value
 

2020 trade through all texas ports
$638 BILLION

2020 trade through hidalgo county ports of entry
$33 BILLION

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Hidalgo County Ports of Entry: Top 10 Commodities, 2020

Hidalgo County Ports of Entry: Top 10 Commodities, 2020
Commodity Value
Electronics 11.18 billion dollars
Machinery 3.86 billion dollars
Edible Fruit and Nuts 3.01 billion dollars
Petroleum Products 2.92 billion dollars
Optic and Medical Equipment 2.23 billion dollars
Vehicles 1.59 billion dollars
Edible Vegetables 1.57 billion dollars
Plastics 1.18 billion dollars
Furniture and Bedding 0.68 billion dollars
Iron or Steel Products 0.57 billion dollars

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Trade Online

Hidalgo County Total Manufacturing Industry

Total Industry Employment
6,970

Industry Average Wages
$42,487

Total Industry Wages
$296 million

Source: JobsEQ



In partnership with Reynosa’s maquiladoras, Hidalgo County and the city of McAllen teamed up to immunize more than 3,000 maquiladora workers from Reynosa with the Johnson & Johnson vaccine in summer 2021.

Maquiladoras are Mexican factories that receive raw materials from the U.S. on a duty- and tariff-free basis and return finished goods to the U.S. Maquiladoras play a significant role in the economic growth of the Hidalgo County area with the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in the 1990s and the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) in 2020.

This is one in a series of reports the Comptroller has prepared on Texas supply chains.

See more information on Supply Chains and the Texas economy.

Glenn Hegar

Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts



Questions?

If you have any questions or concerns regarding the material on this page, please contact the Comptroller’s Data Analysis and Transparency Division.

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