Skip navigation
Glenn Hegar
Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts
Glenn Hegar
Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts
Glenn Hegar
Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts

Breaking the state's laws is a losing proposition. Read about those who found that out the hard way.

November 2021

Nov. 18

Diosvany Anaya Fajardo, 43, of Houston pleaded guilty to illegally obtaining 123 gallons of diesel fuel worth $259 from a Pasadena gas station in August 2020.

A Harris County district judge granted the defendant deferred adjudication and sentenced him to four years’ probation. He also ordered him to pay $290 in court costs.

Fajardo admitted to engaging in a fuel transaction without a license, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

Department of Public Safety (DPS) investigators observed the defendant parking at a diesel pump on the far end of the station. Fuel from multiple pumps were dispensed into his modified truck. His truck bed was equipped with auxiliary fuel tanks and dispensary equipment.

A Comptroller investigator’s inspection at the scene confirmed that the defendant’s truck functioned as a fuel transport vehicle.

Nov. 4

Maikel Avila-Perez, 41, of Houston, pleaded guilty to using re-encoded credit cards to fraudulently obtain 30 gallons of diesel fuel worth $94.

A Harris County district judge granted the defendant deferred adjudication, sentenced him to five years’ probation and 60 hours of community service. He also ordered him to pay $290 in court costs.

Avila-Perez admitted to engaging in a fuel transaction without a license, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. A charge for possession of counterfeit credit cards with less than five items was dismissed as part of his plea agreement.

In January 2018, local police arrested the defendant after reportedly observing him pumping fuel into an auxiliary tank of a pickup bed while using counterfeit credit/debit cards. The vehicle was modified to receive, transport and dispense fuel.

Investigators found one of four cards used in the illegal transaction.

Nov. 1

Raj Kumar Tamang, 38, of Fort Worth, was indicted for allegedly obtaining a coin-operated amusement machine license by fraud.

Tamang is charged with obtaining a license by fraud, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, and failure to report or provide information to the comptroller, a Class B misdemeanor punishable by up to 180 days in jail, a fine up to $2,000 or both.

On August 4 and 5, an investigation revealed that the defendant was displaying and operating numerous coin-operated amusement machines registered to another owner, according to reports. Investigators obtained information that he failed to provide records as required.

The case is pending prosecution in Tarrant County.


October 2021

Oct. 28

Sarah Christine Arcillas, 33, and Maria Sheila Swafford, 52, both of San Antonio, were indicted for allegedly failing to pay motor vehicle sales tax collected.

Arcillas and Swafford are charged with failure to remit taxes collected by a motor vehicle dealer of $1,500 or more but less than $20,000, a felony punishable by confinement in a state jail for at least six months and up to two years and a fine of up to $10,000.

In 2018 and 2019, the defendants allegedly sold vehicles but failed to complete the title transfers or pay the taxes collected, title and registration fees on those sales.

The case is pending prosecution in Bexar County.

Jorge Hernandez-Guerra, 33, of Houston, pleaded guilty to using re-encoded gift cards to fraudulently obtain 166 gallons of diesel fuel worth $433 from a Houston gas station.

A Harris County district judge granted the defendant deferred adjudication, sentenced him to three years’ probation and 60 hours of community service. He also ordered him to pay $290 in court costs.

Hernandez-Guerra admitted to engaging in a fuel transaction without a license, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. A charge for possession of counterfeit credit cards with fewer than five items was dismissed as part of his plea agreement.

In January 2020, local police reportedly observed the defendant pumping diesel fuel into a concealed auxiliary tank spanning the entire depth of his pickup bed. The vehicle was modified to receive, transport and dispense fuel.

He made five unauthorized transactions. Investigators confiscated a counterfeit gift card after the defendant attempted to dispose of multiple cards before being searched.

Oct. 18

Stephen Thornton, 70, of Dallas, was arrested for allegedly obtaining an amusement machine license by fraud.

During an inspection at four different locations, investigators seized 11 amusement machines that were not owned by the suspect. Further research found that 11 decals were purchased and registered to him for use of the machines. An investigation revealed that he submitted a general business license renewal and additional sticker application through fraud, then sold decals obtained by the applications.

Thornton is charged with obtaining a license by fraud, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000, and two counts of tampering with a government record, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

The case is pending prosecution in Dallas County.

Julius Tyler Dickens, 30, of Beaumont was indicted for allegedly making a false entry related to a sales and use tax exemption certificate.

Dickens is charged with tampering with a government document with the intent to defraud, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000; and with false entry on sales tax records, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

The defendant purchased furniture and advised the business that he had a tax exemption. He provided false information when completing a sales and use tax exemption certificate and was not affiliated with the business listed on the form, according to reports. The founder of the entity did not authorize him to use the business’ information for the purchase.

The case is pending prosecution in Hardin County.

Andrew Michael Correll, 30, of Houston, pleaded guilty to making fraudulent claims totaling more than $850,000 to the Comptroller’s Unclaimed Property Division in June 2020.

A Harris County district judge granted the defendant deferred adjudication, sentenced him to five years’ probation and 200 hours of community service. He must attend and complete two court-ordered education programs, pay a $1,500 fine and $290 in court costs.

Dismissed in his plea agreement was the related charge of forgery with the intent to obtain property greater than $300,000. He pleaded guilty to submitting false statements to obtain property greater than $300,000. Both offenses are first-degree felonies, punishable by five to 99 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

Employees in the Comptroller’s Unclaimed Property Division became suspicious of the numerous claims the defendant filed and notified the Comptroller’s Criminal Investigation Division (CID). An investigation revealed that a forged document and false statements were made when submitting the claims. Several affidavits obtained from the entities involved stated that the defendant had no authority to make claims or access the funds.

Oct. 12

Bobby Dion Mitchell, 55, of Bastrop, was indicted for allegedly forging a government treasury warrant.

Mitchell is charged with forgery, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. The indictment was enhanced from a state jail felony offense to a second-degree felony offense based on previous felony convictions from other unrelated cases.

In June 2020, the defendant forged and attempted to cash a warrant at two local gas stations that purportedly had been issued by a state agency for crime victims. During a voluntary interview, the defendant advised that he was authorized to endorse his spouse’s warrant when further investigation revealed it was endorsed and cashed without the victim’s consent.

The case is pending prosecution in Bastrop County.

Oct. 8

Raul Guerra Morales, 35, of Austin, was arrested for allegedly using re-encoded gift cards with stolen credit/debit card information to illegally acquire 32 gallons of diesel fuel worth $97 from a chain grocery store in Kyle.

Officers reportedly observed the suspect acquiring the fuel. Store receipts show that he completed two transactions at the pump using two different cards. Investigators found two of 14 counterfeit gift cards used in the fraudulent transactions.

A motor fuel tax inspection revealed an approximate 100-gallon auxiliary fuel tank and two 60-gallon saddle tanks behind a sleeper cab that was modified from the box portion of his van. The vehicle was outfitted with a pump, fuel hose, nozzle and digital fuel meter to receive, transport and dispense fuel.

Morales is charged with evading or attempting to evade motor fuel tax, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

The case is pending prosecution in Hays County.

Oct. 6

Pavel Victor Reyes Flores, 40, of Kermit, was arrested for allegedly using re-encoded charge cards to illegally acquire 122 gallons of diesel fuel worth $350 from a Kyle chain convenience store. The suspect was dispensing fuel into a large auxiliary fuel tank in the bed of his pickup, according to reports. During the investigation, officers found 26 counterfeit cards. A motor fuel tax inspection showed a fuel tank of approximately 224 gallons at full capacity with diesel fuel.

Flores is charged with evading or attempting to evade motor fuel tax, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

CID assisted the Kyle Police Department with the investigation of case, which is pending prosecution in Hays County.

Mirza Tanveer Akhtar, 52, of Kaufman, was arrested for allegedly operating a coin-operated amusement machine at his place of busines without a license or certificate.

During an inspection of the premises, an investigator identified that one of six machines did not have a current state tax decal and was sealed in accordance with the Occupations Code. An investigation determined that the suspect owned and displayed the coin-operated amusement machine without a general business license or registration certificate.

Akhtar is charged with operating a coin-operated amusement machine without a general business license or registration certificate, a Class A misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in jail and a fine of up to $4,000 or both.

The case is pending prosecution in Kaufman County.

Oct. 1

John Alihemati, 62, of El Paso, pleaded guilty to falsifying information on joint statements (vehicle title applications).

An El Paso County district judge granted him deferred adjudication, sentenced him to two years’ probation and 100 hours of community service. He was also placed on curfew and ordered to attend theft counseling, pay a $1,000 fine and $1,366 in restitution.

He pleaded guilty to three counts of signing a false statement which is a motor vehicle tax code crime. All three offenses are third-degree felonies, punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

An investigation revealed that on five different occasions, the defendant filed motor vehicle titles to the tax assessor-collector with forged buyers’ signatures containing false material facts on the joint statements. The sale amount of the vehicle displayed on the title was being reported at a lower price.


September 2021

Sept. 30

Alberto Almira-Santos, 37, of Pflugerville pleaded guilty to using a re-encoded card with stolen credit/debit card information to fraudulently obtain 82 gallons of diesel fuel from a chain convenience store in New Braunfels.

A Comal County district judge granted the defendant deferred adjudication (no final conviction), sentenced him to five years’ probation and 300 hours of community service. He also fined him $2,000 and ordered him to pay $290 in court costs.

Almira-Santos admitted to fraudulent possession of credit/debit card information, a first-degree felony punishable by five to 99 years or life and a fine up to $10,000. The charges of evading motor fuel tax and unlawful use of a criminal instrument were both dismissed as part of his plea agreement.

In June 2020, the defendant was observed illegally acquiring diesel fuel. The store manager recognized him from previous fuel purchases at the same location on seven different occasions as verified by store receipts and surveillance video.

Officers located 127 counterfeit cards during a vehicle inventory. A motor fuel tax inspection revealed an approximate 280-gallon fuel tank in the truck bed. The truck was outfitted with a pump, fuel hose, fuel nozzle and digital fuel meter to deliver fuel to another vehicle. A toggle switch used to direct the fuel from the supply tank to the auxiliary tank was inside the truck cab.

Osvaldo Martinez-Hernandez, 54, of Midland pleaded guilty to obtaining large amounts of diesel fuel from a West Texas gas location in September 2020.

A Midland County district judge sentenced the defendant to eight years’ probation and 300 hours of community service. He also ordered him to pay $101,762 in restitution and $290 in court costs.

Martinez-Hernandez admitted to evading motor fuel tax and unlawful interception, use or disclosure of wire, oral or electronic communications, both second-degree felonies punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. The charge of transporting motor fuel without shipping documents was dismissed as part of his plea agreement.

The defendant was observed putting diesel fuel into large auxiliary fuel tanks in the bed of his truck. A traffic stop was conducted as his vehicle was leaving the premises. He was detained until investigators could perform a motor fuel tax compliance inspection.

A remote-control device was located in the center console during a consent to search the vehicle. Investigators determined that the diesel fuel was unlawfully dispensed by using the remote to place the pumps into maintenance mode while allowing the pumps to free-flow the fuel without any transaction details.

Sept. 29

Antonio Cedric Foster, 41, of Arlington was arrested for allegedly failing to pay sales tax collected.

An investigation revealed that the suspect was intentionally and knowingly operating his business without a sales and use tax permit, and he did not pay the state taxes owing over $1,500 and under $20,000 from 2016 to 2019.

Foster is charged with failure to remit sales tax collected of $1,500 or more but less than $20,000, a felony punishable by confinement in a state jail for six months up to two years and a fine up to $10,000.

The case is pending prosecution in Tarrant County.

Sept. 28

Yamil Hernandez-Valdes, 34, of Houston pleaded guilty to using a re-encoded charge card to illegally acquire 29 gallons of diesel fuel worth $74 from a Houston gas station.

A Harris County district judge granted the defendant deferred adjudication and sentenced him to two years’ probation. He also ordered him to pay $350 in court costs and fees.

Dismissed in his plea agreement was the related charge for engaging in a fuel transaction without a license, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. He pleaded guilty to fraudulent use or possession of credit or debit card information with less than five items, a felony punishable by confinement in a state jail for six months up to two years and a fine up to $10,000, was reduced to community supervision.

In February 2020, investigators reportedly observed the defendant dispensing diesel fuel into two auxiliary fuel tanks partially concealed in the truck bed. During a traffic stop, they confiscated a digital information storage card that contained 27 credit/debit card numbers.

Cruz Plasencia, 47, of Houston pleaded guilty to concealing motor fuel in violation of the Texas Motor Fuels Tax Code for an offense which occurred in January 2020.

A Harris County district judge sentenced the defendant to three days in jail, crediting him with two days’ time served, and ordered him to pay $615 in court costs and fees. As part of his plea agreement, the charge for transporting motor fuel without shipping documents, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, was reduced to a Class A misdemeanor, which is punishable by up to one year in jail, a fine up to $4,000 or both.

Local police reportedly witnessed the defendant driving a truck into a trucking yard. He allegedly dispensed fuel from a tank in his truck into a large bladder owned by another person.

Sept. 24

Edel Gonzalez, 32, of Houston pleaded guilty to using a charge card to illegally obtain 38 gallons of diesel fuel worth $132.

A Harris County district judge sentenced the defendant to 20 days in jail, crediting him with 18 days’ time served, and ordered him to pay $335 in court costs and fees.

As part of his plea agreement, the charges for engaging in a fuel transaction without a license, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, and displaying a fictitious license plate, a Class B misdemeanor punishable by up to 180 day in jail, a fine up to $2,000 or both, were dismissed. The charge for credit/debit card abuse, a felony punishable by confinement in a state jail for six months up to two years and a fine up to $10,000, was adjudicated pursuant to 12.44 of the Texas Penal Code and his punishment was reduced to misdemeanor confinement in the county jail.

In May 2018, local police observed the defendant dispensing large quantities of diesel fuel into an auxiliary tank in the truck bed. Investigators determined that the vehicle was modified to transport fuel.

Sept. 21

Yunier Cruz, 29, of Pflugerville was arrested for allegedly using re-encoded cards with stolen credit/debit card information to unlawfully acquire 62 gallons of diesel fuel worth $179 from a chain grocery store.

During a consent to search of a vehicle, investigators located and confiscated 47 counterfeit cards. A motor fuel tax inspection revealed an approximate 100-gallon auxiliary fuel tank concealed in the bed of the truck. It was outfitted with a pump and fuel hose to receive, transport and dispense fuel. Cruz confirmed that he did not have the required permits or documents.

Cruz is charged with evading or attempting to evade motor fuel tax, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, and credit/debit card abuse, a felony punishable by confinement in a state jail for six months up to two years and a fine up to $10,000.

The case is pending prosecution in Hays County.

Ajitpal Singh Toor, 37, of Fort Worth and Jaswinder Singh Randhawa, 69, of Southlake were arrested for allegedly possessing tobacco products without the state-issued permit required to be posted in public view.

During a compliance inspection of the suspects’ business, an investigator reportedly observed several violations. A cigarette and tobacco retail permit was not visibly posted in the business as required by statute, and notification forms were not completed by employees.

Toor and Randhawa are charged with possession of tobacco products without a posted tobacco permit, a Class A misdemeanor, which is punishable by up to one year in jail, a fine up to $4,000 or both.

The case is pending prosecution in Johnson County.

Lakeria Washington, 24, of Houston was indicted for allegedly forging a government instrument.

Washington is charged with forgery of a government financial instrument, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

In May 2018, the defendant forged and cashed a treasury warrant at a chain grocery store that purportedly had been issued by a state agency for hurricane victims.

The case is pending prosecution in Harris County.

Sept. 20

Pedro Ruiz Crespo, 49, of Houston pleaded guilty to concealing motor fuel in violation of the Texas Motor Fuels Tax Code which occurred in January 2020.

A Harris County district judge sentenced the defendant to three days in jail, crediting him with two days’ time served, and ordered him to pay $595 in court costs and fees.

As part of his plea agreement, the charge for transporting motor fuel without shipping documents, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, was reduced to a Class A misdemeanor which is punishable by up to one year in jail, a fine up to $4,000 or both. Local police reportedly witnessed the defendant driving a truck into a trucking yard. He allegedly dispensed fuel from a tank in his truck into a large bladder owned by another person.

Sept. 18

Paula Najera, 25, of Dallas was arrested for allegedly failing to maintain the required records on tobacco purchases.

An on-site inspection revealed that the suspect, who owned the business, failed to maintain and produce the required records from July 2020 to July 2021.

Najera is charged with failure to maintain requisite tax books and records, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

The case is pending prosecution in Dallas County.

Sept. 15

Rodolfo Giniebra-Santos, 26, of Pflugerville pleaded guilty to using a re-encoded card with stolen credit/debit card information to fraudulently obtain 82 gallons of diesel fuel from a chain convenience store in New Braunfels.

A Comal County district judge granted the defendant deferred adjudication (no final conviction), sentenced him to five years’ probation and 300 hours of community service. He also fined him $500 and ordered him to pay $290 in court costs.

Giniebra-Santos admitted to fraudulent use of credit/debit card information, a first-degree felony punishable by five to 99 years or life and a fine up to $10,000. The charges of evading motor fuel tax and unlawful use of a criminal instrument were both dismissed as part of his plea agreement.

In June 2020, the defendant was observed illegally acquiring diesel fuel. The store manager recognized him from previous fuel purchases at the same location on seven different occasions as verified by store receipts and surveillance video.

Officers located 127 counterfeit cards during a vehicle inventory. A motor fuel tax inspection revealed an approximate 280-gallon fuel tank in the truck bed. The truck was outfitted with a pump, fuel hose, fuel nozzle and digital fuel meter to deliver fuel to another vehicle. A toggle switch used to direct the fuel from the supply tank to the auxiliary tank that was inside the truck cab.

Sept. 13

Donald James Tigert, 63, of Frisco was arrested for allegedly operating a coin-operated amusement machine without a license.

An inspection revealed that the suspect was displaying and operating a coin-operated amusement machine with an expired state tax decal. He was identified as the owner of the amusement machine, and he did not have an active general business license or registration certificate.

Tigert is charged with operating amusement machines without a general business license or registration certificate, a Class A misdemeanor, which is punishable by up to one year in jail, a fine up to $4,000 or both.

The case is pending prosecution in Johnson County.

Sept. 7

Orlando Martinez-Borrell, 28, of Houston pleaded guilty to using re-encoded charge cards to unlawfully purchase 67 gallons of diesel fuel worth $174.

A Harris County district judge granted the defendant deferred adjudication, sentenced him to 4 years’ probation and ordered him to pay $290 in court costs.

Martinez-Borrell admitted to fraudulent possession of credit card information of more than 10 but fewer than 50 items, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. The charge of engaging in a fuel transaction without a license, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, was dismissed as part of his plea agreement.

Local police reportedly observed the defendant dispensing fuel into an auxiliary tank located in the bed of a truck. Ten counterfeit cards were found in his possession. The vehicle was modified with pumps and hoses to receive and dispense fuel.

Sept. 1

Valerie Richelle Ellis, 34, and John Anthony Rodrigues, 39, of The Colony were arrested for allegedly failing to pay sales tax collected.

An investigation revealed that the suspects were operating their business without a sales and use tax permit. Records provided to the investigator confirmed that sales tax was collected, however did not pay the state taxes totaling several thousands of dollars.

Ellis and Rodrigues are charged with failure to remit sales tax collected of $1,500 or more but less than $20,000, a felony punishable by confinement in a state jail for six months up to two years and a fine up to $10,000.

The case is pending prosecution in Denton County.

Zachary Dale Rucas, 34, of Hico pleaded guilty to having 80 gallons of red dyed diesel fuel stored in his vehicle for use in violation of the Texas Motor Fuels Tax Code.

A Howard County judge sentenced the defendant to 12 months’ probation and 24 hours of community service. He also fined him $500 and ordered him to pay $270 in court costs.

Rucas admitted to concealing motor fuel, a Class A misdemeanor, which is punishable by up to one year in jail, a fine up to $4,000 or both.

An investigator discovered the defendant concealing the dyed diesel fuel during fuel compliance inspections at various oil rig locations. Both the main supply and auxiliary fuel tanks of his truck contained the dyed diesel.


August 2021

August 20

Luis Ochoa Cabrera, 59, of Houston was indicted for allegedly using re-encoded charge cards to illegally acquire 68 gallons of diesel fuel worth $149 last winter.

Cabrera is charged with evading or attempting to evade motor fuel tax, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, and with credit card or debit card abuse, a felony punishable by confinement in a state jail for six months up to two years and a fine up to $10,000.

On February 4, the defendant was observed using counterfeit cards to purchase diesel fuel. Investigators determined that the entire bed of his truck was retrofitted to conceal a 350-gallon fuel tank. It was outfitted with a pump, fuel hose, fuel nozzle and digital meter to deliver fuel to another vehicle, according to reports.

The case is pending prosecution in Lee County.

August 19

Raj Kumar Tamang, 38, of Fort Worth was arrested for allegedly obtaining a coin-operated amusement machine license by fraud and operating coin-operated amusement machines without a license.

An investigation revealed that the suspect was displaying and operating numerous coin-operated amusement machines registered to another owner, according to reports. Investigators obtained information that he failed to provide records as required.

Tamang is charged with obtaining a license by fraud, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, and failure to report or provide information to the comptroller, a Class B misdemeanor punishable by up to 180 days in jail, a fine up to $2,000, or both.

The case is pending prosecution in Tarrant County.

August 18

Alexeis Victor Salva-Matos, 36, of Irving was indicted for allegedly using re-encoded cards to fraudulently obtain 107 gallons of diesel fuel worth $199.

Salva-Matos is charged with transporting motor fuel without a cargo manifest or shipping documents, attempting to evade motor fuel tax and fraudulent use or possession of credit or debit card information of more than 10 but fewer than 50 items, all second-degree felonies punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. He is also charged with unlawful use of a criminal instrument (i.e., his pickup truck), a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

In November 2020, an investigation revealed that the defendant intentionally and knowingly attempted to evade motor fuel tax by failing to pay the backup diesel tax liability, and transported motor fuel without a cargo manifest. He was also in possession of counterfeit cards used in acquiring the fuel.

The case is pending prosecution in Dallas County.

Andy Nunez-Leon, 36, of Houston pleaded guilty to using re-encoded charge cards for unlawfully acquiring 37 gallons of diesel fuel in the amount of $99.

A Harris County district judge sentenced the defendant to two days in jail, crediting him with two days’ time served, and ordered him to pay $290 in court costs.

Nunez-Leon admitted to engaging in a fuel transaction without a license, which was reduced from a third-degree felony to a Class A misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail, a fine of up to $4,000, or both.

An investigation revealed that the defendant knowingly and intentionally delivered diesel fuel into an auxiliary fuel tank and acted as a motor fuel transporter without a required license. 22 counterfeit cards were found in his possession.

August 16

Timothy Goff, 54, of Godley was arrested for allegedly falsifying information related to a sales and use tax permit.

An investigation revealed that the suspect provided false information when completing a sales and use tax permit. The permit was not issued due to an existing liability, according to reports.

Goff is charged with tampering with a government record with the intent to defraud or harm, a felony punishable by confinement in a state jail for six months up to two years and a fine up to $10,000.

The case is pending prosecution in Johnson County.

August 11

Roshan Mainali, 20, of Irving was arrested for allegedly possessing tobacco products without the state-issued permits required to be posted in public view.

During a compliance inspection of the suspect’s place of business, investigators reportedly confirmed that the tobacco sales permit along with the sales and use tax permit posted were not the originals as required by statute. He advised both originals were located at his residence.

Mainali is charged with possession of tobacco products without a posted tobacco permit, a Class A misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail, a fine of up to $4,000, or both.

The case is pending prosecution in Tarrant County.

Osvaldo Martinez-Hernandez, 53, of Midland and Jorge Luis Barreto Cisneros, 28, of Odessa were indicted for allegedly obtaining large amounts of diesel fuel from a West Texas gas location.

Martinez-Hernandez and Cisneros are charged with motor fuel tax evasion and transporting motor fuel without shipping documents, both second-degree felonies punishable by two to 20 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine. Hernandez is also charged with unlawful interception, use or disclosure of wire, oral or electronic communications, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine.

The defendants were observed appropriating diesel fuel into large auxiliary fuel tanks in the beds of their trucks. Deputies conducted traffic stops as the vehicles were leaving the premises. They were detained until investigators arrived and conducted a motor fuel tax compliance inspection.

During a consented vehicle search, a remote-control device was found in the center console of Martinez-Hernandez's truck. Investigators suspect that the diesel fuel was unlawfully dispensed by using the remote to place the pumps into maintenance mode while allowing the pumps to free-flow the diesel fuel without any transaction details.

The case is pending prosecution in Midland County.

August 9

Hector Fredy Rios Estrada, 50, of Austin was arrested for allegedly using re-encoded charge cards to unlawfully purchase 84 gallons of diesel fuel worth $250 from a chain convenience store.

Investigators conducting joint surveillance observed the suspect perform two transactions and dispense the fuel into a large auxiliary fuel tank in the bed of his truck. They continued rolling surveillance and noticed him stop at another location appropriating fuel into a semi-truck and into an auxiliary tank of a utility truck bed. Nine counterfeit cards were confiscated during a motor fuel tax inspection.

Estrada is charged with transporting motor fuel without shipping documents and attempting to evade motor fuel tax, both second-degree felonies punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. He is also charged with unlawful use of a criminal instrument (i.e., his pickup truck), a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

DPS assisted CID with the investigation of the case, which is pending prosecution in Travis County.

August 5

Raidel Borrego Cardoso, 35, of Burleson and Jeilier Sarria Gutierrez, 22, of Hialeah, Fl. were arrested for alleged using a re-encoded charge card to illegally acquire 127 gallons of diesel fuel worth $392.

A motor fuel tax inspection revealed a concealed auxiliary fuel tank in the flatbed of the truck. The vehicle was outfitted with a fuel hose, digital meter and nozzle to receive, transport and dispense motor fuel. Gutierrez confirmed that he did not have the required permits or documents.

Cardoso and Gutierrez are charged with attempting to evade motor fuel tax, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

The Bastrop County Sheriff’s Office assisted CID with the investigation of the case, which is pending prosecution in Bastrop County.

Isabel Hernandez Cue, 35, of Houston pleaded guilty for driving the vehicle used to fraudulently obtain more than 78 gallons of diesel fuel from a Katy supermarket.

A Fort Bend County district judge granted the defendant deferred adjudication (no final conviction), sentenced him to six months’ probation and 50 hours of community service. He also fined him $1,000 and ordered him to pay $290 in court costs.

Cue admitted to fraudulent possession of identifying information, a Class A misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail, a fine of up to $4,000, or both. Dismissed in her plea agreement were related charges of transporting motor fuel without a cargo manifest, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, and unlawful use of a criminal instrument (i.e., the truck), a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

On January 17, an employee reportedly witnessed her passenger use counterfeit cards to purchase the fuel. During a subsequent traffic stop, officers determined that the vehicle was outfitted with a fuel tank mounted in the bed of the pickup truck. It had been modified to receive, transport and dispense motor fuel.

August 4

Yoandry Pereira Tamayo, 39, of Porter was indicted for allegedly using re-encoded charge cards to unlawfully purchase 72 gallons of diesel fuel worth $187 in January 2020.

Tamayo is charged with transporting motor fuel without a cargo manifest and attempting to evade motor fuel tax, second-degree felonies punishable by two to 20 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine; unlawful use of a criminal instrument (i.e., his pickup truck), a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000; and fraudulent use or possession of identifying information with less than 5 items, a felony punishable by confinement in a state jail for six months up to two years and a fine up to $10,000.

A Department of Public Safety (DPS) agent reportedly observed the defendant conducting a fuel transaction using counterfeit cards. An investigation revealed a black fuel bladder in the bed of the defendant’s truck. It was outfitted to receive, transport and dispense motor fuel.

The case is pending prosecution in Hardin County.


July 2021

July 31

Kevin Lemar Sanchez, 31, of Houston pleaded guilty to forgery of a treasury warrant.

A Harris County district judge granted the defendant deferred adjudication (no final conviction) and sentenced him to two years’ probation and $500 in restitution, plus fees and court costs.

Sanchez admitted to forgery of a government instrument, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

In September 2017, an investigation revealed that the defendant intentionally forged and cashed a treasury warrant at a chain grocery store.

July 29

Leonardo Rodriguez Hidalgo, 42, of Grand Prairie and Reinaldo Rodriguez Moya, 50, of Houston were arrested for allegedly using a re-encoded charge card to fraudulently purchase 29 gallons of diesel fuel worth $85 from a chain convenience store in Gainesville.

An investigation revealed that the suspects allegedly used a counterfeit card to obtain the fuel. Investigators confirmed the fraudulent purchase with a receipt of the transaction from the business.

Hidalgo and Moya are charged with transporting motor fuel without a cargo manifest or shipping documents and attempting to evade motor fuel tax, both second-degree felonies punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, and unlawful use of a criminal instrument (i.e., his pickup truck), a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

CID assisted the Cooke County Sheriff’s Office with the investigation of the case, which is pending prosecution in Cooke County.

Armando Esponda Lopez, 51, and Rosbel LaRosa Acebo, 38, both of Houston were indicted for allegedly using re-encoded charge cards to illegally obtain 281 gallons of diesel fuel and 19 gallons of premium gasoline in March 2021.

Lopez and Acebo are charged with evading or attempting to evade motor fuel tax, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, and engaging in a motor fuel transaction without a permit, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. A credit card abuse victim contacted local law enforcement stating that her card was used at a gas station in Garwood, according to reports. The defendants were arrested after an officer reviewed video surveillance and determined that they used counterfeit cards to purchase the fuel.

The gasoline was dispensed into the primary tank of a pickup truck. The diesel fuel was dispensed into two large steel tanks in the cargo trailer and an auxiliary tank in the bed of the truck.

CID assisted the Colorado County Sheriff’s Office with the investigation of the case, which is pending prosecution in Colorado County.

Luis Ochoa Cabrera, 59, of Houston was indicted for allegedly purchasing 32 gallons of diesel fuel worth $89 last spring.

Cabrera is charged with evading or attempting to evade motor fuel tax, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, and with credit card abuse, a felony punishable by confinement in a state jail for six months up to two years and a fine up to $10,000.

On May 12, the defendant was under surveillance by investigators who reportedly witnessed him purchasing the fuel with counterfeit cards.

The case is pending prosecution in Colorado County.

July 22

Osmany Romero Peguero, 42, of Odessa was arrested for allegedly using re-encoded charge cards to unlawfully obtain 43 gallons of diesel fuel worth $149 and 16 gallons of unleaded gasoline worth $50 from a convenience store in Garden City.

During a search of the suspect’s vehicle, officers confiscated 16 counterfeit cards reportedly used in the fraudulent transactions. A fuel tax inspection uncovered a 90-gallon auxiliary fuel tank in the bed of the suspect’s pickup truck. He allegedly stated in an interview that he did not have shipping documents, a license or permit to transport the fuel.

Peguero is charged with transporting motor fuel without shipping documents, evading or attempting to evade motor fuel tax and fraudulent use or possession of more than 10 but fewer than 50 items of credit/debit card information, all second-degree felonies punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

CID assisted the Glasscock County Sheriff’s Office with the investigation of the case, which is pending prosecution in Glasscock County.

July 20

Alexis Miguel Matos-Pena, 49, of Odessa was arrested for allegedly possessing re-encoded charge cards.

An officer conducting a fuel tax inspection observed a large auxiliary fuel tank in the flatbed of Matos-Pena’s pickup truck. It was connected to hoses, a fuel pump and a nozzle with a digital meter to dispense the fuel. During the investigation and arrest, nine counterfeit cards were found in the suspect’s possession, according to reports.

Matos-Pena is charged with fraudulent use or possession of more than five but fewer than 10 items of credit/debit card information, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

CID assisted the Glasscock County Sheriff’s Office with the investigation of the case, which is pending prosecution in Glasscock County.

July 16

Ahmad Abed Khalil, 36, of Haslet was arrested for allegedly possessing tobacco products without the state-issued permits required to be posted in public view.

During a compliance inspection of the suspect’s place of business, investigators reportedly noted several health and safety code violations. A cigarette and tobacco retail permit and a sales and use tax permit were not visibly posted in the business as required by statute. A store employee found the tobacco permit, according to reports, but the sales tax permit was never located.

Khalil is charged with possession of tobacco products without a posted tobacco permit, a Class A misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail, a fine of up to $4,000, or both.

The case is pending prosecution in Tarrant County.

July 9

Roberto Yordano Porras-Barreto, 31, of Midland was arrested for allegedly using re-encoded charge cards to illegally purchase 43 gallons of diesel fuel worth $150 from a Garden City convenience store.

The store manager reportedly observed the suspect obtaining the fuel. Video surveillance and receipts from the business confirmed the fraudulent transactions, reports show.

After conducting a motor vehicle inspection, an officer observed a large, metal auxiliary tank laying in the truck bed concealed underneath a black, hard-shell bed cover. A hole cut in the cover exposed the fuel cap. Investigators reportedly found 41 counterfeit cards in the suspect’s possession.

Porras-Barreto is charged with evading motor fuel tax and transporting motor fuel without a cargo manifest, both second-degree felonies punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

CID assisted the Glasscock County Sheriff’s Office with the investigation of the case, which is pending prosecution in Glasscock County.

July 6

Victor Manuel Garcia-Yaque, 38, of Odessa was arrested for allegedly using re-encoded charge cards to fraudulently purchase 30 gallons of diesel fuel worth $102 from a Garden City convenience store.

A fuel tax inspection revealed 60- and 90-gallon auxiliary fuel tanks with an electric pump, fuel hose and nozzle in the bed of the pickup truck. During a vehicle search, 32 counterfeit cards were found in the suspect’s possession, reports show.

Garcia-Yaque is charged with transporting motor fuel without shipping documents and evading or attempting to evade motor fuel tax, both second-degree felonies punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

CID assisted the Glasscock County Sheriff’s Office with the investigation of the case, which is pending prosecution in Glasscock County.

July 4

Eduardo Arderi, 44, of Miami, Fla. was arrested for allegedly using re-encoded charge cards to unlawfully obtain 77 gallons of diesel fuel worth $147 from a chain convenience store in Euless.

An investigation revealed that the suspect avoided paying motor fuel tax. Reports show that his vehicle had been modified to receive, transport and dispense motor fuel. Eight counterfeit cards were found in the suspect’s possession, according to reports.

Arderi is charged with transporting motor fuel without a cargo manifest or shipping documents and evading or attempting to evade motor fuel tax, both second-degree felonies punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

The case is pending prosecution in Tarrant County.

July 2

Loannys Martinez-Casa, 38, of Houston pleaded guilty to using re-encoded charge cards to illegally purchase 73 gallons of diesel fuel worth $188 at a gas station in East Houston in December 2019.

A Harris County district judge sentenced the defendant to two years in prison, crediting him with 244 days’ time served, plus fees and court costs.

Martinez-Casa admitted to fraudulent use/possession of more than 10 but fewer than 50 items of credit/debit card information, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. A related charge of engaging in a fuel transaction without a license, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, was dismissed in his plea agreement.

Local police observed the suspect conducting multiple fuel transactions and confiscated 33 counterfeit cards from a wallet in his possession. They also discovered an auxiliary fuel tank concealed in the bed of his truck. It had been modified to receive, transport and dispense motor fuel.

July 1

Cristian Rafael Licea Martinez, 30, of Addison was arrested for allegedly using re-encoded charge cards to illegally acquire 156 gallons of diesel fuel worth $449 from multiple locations in Grand Prairie.

An investigation revealed the suspect allegedly used counterfeit cards to purchase the fuel. Video surveillance and business receipts confirmed the fraudulent transactions, reports show. Investigators found that the vehicle had been modified to receive, transport and dispense motor fuel.

Martinez is charged with transporting motor fuel without a cargo manifest or shipping documents and attempting to evade motor fuel tax, both second-degree felonies punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, and unlawful use of a criminal instrument, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

The case is pending prosecution in Dallas County.

Larides Saez Morales, 32, of Houston was arrested for allegedly purchasing diesel fuel from a Devers gas station.

During a traffic stop, an investigator reportedly discovered a black auxiliary fuel tank hidden inside a black box on the bed of the vehicle. A second fuel tank located on the rear end of the truck reportedly contained a substantial amount of diesel fuel. The vehicle was modified to receive, transport and dispense large quantities of motor fuel, reports show.

Morales is charged with engaging in a motor fuel transaction without the required license and unlawful use of a criminal instrument, both third-degree felonies punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

CID assisted the Liberty County Constable’s Office with the investigation of the case, which is pending prosecution in Liberty County.

Yacek Exposito, 39, of Corpus Christi pleaded guilty to using a company fleet card to unlawfully obtain and dispense 502 gallons of diesel fuel.

A Ward County district judge granted the defendant deferred adjudication (no final conviction) and sentenced him to six years’ probation and 600 hours of community service. He also fined him $1,500 and ordered him to pay $1,502 in restitution, plus fees and court costs.

Exposito admitted to evading motor fuel tax, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

An investigation revealed that the defendant evaded or attempted to evade motor fuel tax.

Jorge Felix Lopez, 35, pleaded guilty to illegally purchasing motor fuel without the proper documentation.

A Harris County district judge granted the defendant deferred adjudication (no final conviction), sentencing him to three years’ probation plus fees and court costs.

Lopez admitted to accepting delivery of motor fuel without shipping documents, a second-degree felony punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

In January 2020, local police reportedly witnessed two suspects dispensing diesel fuel into large “bladder” tanks owned by the defendant. During a motor fuel tax inspection, investigators determined the defendants did not have any shipping documents.

Arnaldo Yuriel Armas-Garcia, 37, of Fountain, Colo. pleaded guilty to using re-encoded charge cards to fraudulently obtain 39 gallons of diesel fuel from a chain convenience store in May 2019.

A Fort Bend County district judge sentenced the defendant to 10 days in jail, crediting him with 10 days’ time served, and ordered him to pay court costs.

Armas-Garcia admitted to credit card abuse, which was reduced from a state jail felony to a Class A misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail, a fine of up to $4,000, or both.

Dismissed in his plea agreement were related charges of evading motor fuel tax and purchasing motor fuel with the intent to evade tax, both second-degree felonies punishable by two to 20 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000, and unlawful use of a criminal instrument, a third-degree felony punishable by two to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000.

A store employee witnessed the defendant using counterfeit cards to purchase the fuel. Local police conducted a traffic stop and found he did not have any permits or licenses issued by the Comptroller’s office.

HB855 Browser Statement

In 2015, the Texas Legislature passed House Bill 855, which requires state agencies to publish a list of the three most commonly used Web browsers on their websites. The Texas Comptroller’s most commonly used Web browsers are Google Chrome, Microsoft Internet Explorer and Apple Safari.

We support: